Book Review and Author Interview: Lydia Lukidis

Bees tend to have a bad rap. Mention the word and everyone goes scrambling.

Today, I’m very excited to share with you a fabulous children’s story written by a very talented author, Lydia Lukidis, that explores the topic of bees, beekeeping, and how important these insects are for our world.

This story is part of the ‘Makers Make it Work’ series from Kane press, that shares easy-to-read stories focusing on problem-solving and hands-on action.

Title: THE BROKEN BEES’ NEST

Ages: 5-8

Series: Makers Make It Work

Author: Lydia Lukidis

Illustrator: Andre Ceolin

Publisher: Kane Press

Book Features: Activities, Original artwork, and Educational Sidebars

Synopsis: Arun and Keya find the perfect tree for a tree house, but it’s full of bees—and their nest is falling apart! Can Arun and Keya help the bees find a new home?

Let’s meet the talented author, Lydia Lukidis!

This is such a great story exposing children to bees and their importance in our world. How did you get involved with Kane Press’s ‘Makers Make it Work’ series and where did you come up with the idea for THE BROKEN BEE’S NEST?

I started doing work-for-hire projects for educational publishers several years ago. They typically assign writers a topic. I had previously worked with Juliana Lauletta who was an editor at Kane Press (and is now the publisher), and she invited me to write a few books for the Science Solves It series. This resulted in two educational picture books, A REAL LIVE PET! and THE SPACE ROCK MYSTERY. I became passionate about writing nonfiction, especially creative nonfiction. From there, I met Jennifer Arena, an editor at Kane Press, and she invited me to write a book for the Makers Make it Work series. I picked the topic of beekeeping and ended up falling in love with these furry little creatures after writing the book THE BROKEN BEE’S NEST.

How long did it take you to write this story?

The timeline is usually fairly tight for work-for-hire projects, so you need to have your best thinking cap on. I write and edited the story (with the help of the Kane Pres editors) in under two months. That said, there was a slew of edits and feedback going back and forth. It’s actually nice to work within this deadline, because it forces you to keep moving forward.  

Is this your first book with Kane Press?

It’s my third book with Kane Press (see above). I really love working with them. Once upon a time, I studied Pure and Applied Science. While I had an aptitude for science, I soon came to the realization that I didn’t want career in it. So I chose to get my University degree in English literature and poetry instead. Years later, I discovered I loved writing about STEM topics, and all the knowledge I had gathered during the years I studied science was coming into use. You never know what incredible path life will bring you on!

I love how you’ve intertwined bee facts within the story. What kind of research did you do for this story? Did you visit an apiary? If not, would you like to?

Thank-you. I do write straight nonfiction as well, but I especially love creative nonfiction. In this case, you weave the facts and educational matter into a story. It’s fun, engaging, and accessible for children. For research, it’s usually three tiered: I always start with books from my local library. Then I check out reputable websites, and then lastly, I speak to an expert when possible. In this case, I reached out to Kelsey Ducsharm from The Ontario Beekeepers’ Association. She was kind enough to answer my questions, and fact check the book and illustrations. It was very helpful, because as I learned, there are many misconceptions about beehives.

How many revisions did you go through?

On my end, there were dozens of revisions, and then I bounced the story back and forth to the Kane Press editors about 5 or 6 times. I always get flabbergasted by how many edits are necessary, even when the story has less than 1,000 words.

What’s coming up next for you?

I usually work on several manuscripts at a time, which is fun but can feel overwhelming. So I make a to-do list for the week and choose where I’ll place my focus. Right now, I’m finishing the first draft to my new middle grade novel (very exciting, and challenging!). I’m also working on several new picture books and a chapter book. Stay tuned for details!

If any readers want to learn more about you or follow you on social media, where can they find you?

Website: http://www.lydialukidis.com/

Blog: https://lydialukidis.wordpress.com/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LydiaLukidis/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/LydiaLukidis

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/lydialukidis/?trk=hp-identity-name

Thank you for sharing this engaging children’s story exposing children to the importance of bees, problem-solving, and the process of collecting honey.

Thank-you! It’s a pleasure to stop by your blog. Through writing this book, I learned what a critical role bees play in our ecosystem and gained a new respect for them!

You can purchase THE BROKEN BEES’ NEST: BEEKEEPING here.

Did You Know?

Lydia Lukidis is a children’s author with a multi-disciplinary background that spans the fields of literature, science and theater. So far, she has over 40 books and eBooks published, as well as a dozen educational books. Her latest STEM books, A Real Live Pet! and The Space Rock Mystery were published by Kane Press.

Lydia also does school visits and gives writing workshops for children aged 5-12. Her aim is to help children cultivate their imagination, sharpen their writing skills and develop self-confidence while improving their literacy. She is currently part of the Culture in the Schools Program organized by the Ministre de Culture et Communications Québec. For more information, please visit: http://www.lydialukidis.com

Thanks for stopping by. Happy Reading!

How National Parks Helped Teach our Kids about the Environment

“Mom, what are those big white things?” my daughter asks while peering out the window as we drive through the grassy plains of the Midwest.

“Those are wind turbines. The wind helps make energy which gets turned into power. Like the power that turns on the lamp in your room or the lights in the house.”

Immediately following my explanation came the rounds of questions that spilled out of a curious five-year-old’s mouth after being told that a giant monster-like structure uses wind to create power. It is pretty amazing when you think about it.

Our conversation ignited a critical discussion that my husband and I felt we needed to start sharing with our kids about caring for our environment. How can we instill in them an appreciation and respect for the natural living life around them? After wrestling with this big idea, we finally realized the answer is a lot simpler than we thought: It’s about giving our kids opportunities to interact with nature starting at a young age.

What better way to explore this idea than by visiting and discovering the national parks across the United States and exploring the incredible landscapes of our country? With a map of the U.S. displayed in our family room and pins to mark our destinations, we were ready to explore the history, nature, and learn all about the preservation of our land and animals as a family.

With over fifty national parks spread across the U.S. and nearly 300 million visitors each year, these natural wonders can be a cornerstone in the way we address environmental topics with our offspring. The big question is, where do we begin?

Badlands

My family and I found ourselves beginning our journey by trekking through the rough and jagged trails of the Badlands in South Dakota, witnessing the damaging yet, renewing effects of a natural forest fire that had happened near Jewel Cave National Monument. The charred, black trees were the only remains of what once existed in a dense forest. Through the chaos of fallen branches and rotting trunks, sprung new life. Peering through the now open land, flowers and grass were slowly taking the place of what was once alive. This moment sparked an organic conversation about the dangers and causes of forest fires, but also how they can stimulate new growth.

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My husband and I realized the value of teaching our kids about the magnitude of our actions on the ecosystems around us. While hiking on the paths in Yellowstone National Park, our children would discover a leaf or interesting rock along the way. To a young intrigued mind, this made the perfect souvenir to bring home and show friends. However, this proved to be another teachable moment as we explained the importance of leaving nature where you found it.

Kiersten Einsweiler, blogger and fellow adventure seeker from Hiking In My Flipflops, shares how she and her husband have helped their children to develop a deeper understanding of nature’s inhabitants: “We had a recent run-in with a snake on a trail, and my daughter was absolutely terrified – screaming and crying for a good part of the hike back. On the drive home, she thought maybe the snake was actually a ‘kid just like her’ and was just as scared as she was.”

With her children making this connection, Kiersten goes on to say that she believes her children see the “parallels” between how we respect human beings and living creatures and how nature is the “…home and space of a plant or animal.”

Our kids’ favorite experience on our life-long grand adventure was taking part in the National Park’s Junior Ranger program. Over the years, this program has evolved and now includes national monuments, with many being managed by the park service.

Their motto, “Explore, Learn, and Protect,” quoted by the many children sworn in each year, couldn’t be more true. With the typical participant age being between 5 and 13, our daughter could take part. Our son, who is three, was able to participate in the Pee Wee Ranger program offered at Jewel Cave National Monument located in South Dakota’s Black Hills. We have found that regardless of age, all children are encouraged to take part in their programs.

Making our way to Glacier National Park in Montana, our kids were equipped with various tasks in their Ranger booklets and prepared to earn their badges. Marveling at the giant “monsters of ice” as our son called it, we talked about the correlation between human activity and rising temperatures leading to shrinking glaciers.

Next up? Yellowstone, the world’s first national park located in Wyoming. It is known for its geysers, mountain beauty, and hundreds of animal species. With nearly 4 million people visiting the park, there’s bound to be garbage left behind. After picking up bits of trash found tumbling along the backcountry trails, my husband and I showed our kids what the saying, “Whatever comes in, must come out” quote truly means.

Along with Yellowstone, the national park service has made a concerted effort to become more sustainable based on the changing climate, and the impact visitors have made in the parks. Putting this into perspective, Isle Royale, a remote island in Michigan only accessible by plane or boat, spends $15,000 a year removing guests’ trash. This issue is one my husband and I feel we need to bring to the forefront of our children’s minds. Being respectful of the land, which means cleaning up after ourselves so other’s can enjoy it’s beauty too.

Providing tangible dialogue relevant to our future existence, there is a wealth of information to be shared with our little ones. For example, restoration of the Redwood forest, the impact tourists have on soil erosion in Zion National Park, or how trails protect naturally growing plants. And let’s not forget the increased water and air pollution in the Great Smoky Mountains. How about the encounter of non-native species causing detrimental damage in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Park? These are the real-life experiences exposing the significance as to why we must protect these precious resources.

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Or the other right hand…

Looking back, we’ll never forget the moment they raised their right hand and promised to preserve and protect these places so future generations can enjoy them. From exploring the third largest underground cave to hiking, observing, and identifying animal hides, our children were sworn in and declared lifelong Junior Rangers. The quest to accomplish this noble deed and earning a badge to commemorate this momentous time will forever live in our hearts.

In the words of songwriter Woody Guthrie, “From the Redwood Forest to the gulf stream waters. This land was made for you and me.” As we move into the 21st century, our world continues to change along with its environmental issues. Taking the time to search out destinations that satisfy our lust for adventure and thirst for knowledge, let’s continue to bring awareness to our children who will pass it on to future generations.

 

 

Why We Family Garden

Rows upon rows of colorful produce, neatly packaged and anxiously waiting to be chosen. Shoppers are inspecting each perfectly shaped apple, taut skinned peach, and crisp lettuce head while contemplating the purchase of pineapples shipped from Costa Rica. Comparing this to the dirt covered carrots, roots dangling off the ends, or the misshapen strawberries freshly picked off the vine, when I have the choice, I’ll choose the latter or whatever else is in season.

This thought encourages my husband and me to continue talking with our son and daughter about how we get our food and why we should appreciate it. No more wasting half eaten apples or tossing a banana out because it has too many brown spots. Instead, we’ve shifted our old habits and started new ones. Let’s toss them in the backyard composter and watch them magically turn into black gold or throw them in the freezer to use in smoothies later on.

“In the United States, food now travels between 1,500 and 2,500 miles from farm to table, as much as 25 percent farther than two decades ago,” according to an article from World Watch Institute.

Imagine the many hands and miles traveled a single orange or stem of grapes go through before it graces our table. All the effort put into planting, growing, harvesting cleaning, packaging, and shipping just for our enjoyment. Then to be picked over because it’s not as shiny or perfectly shaped as the next.

“In 2008, 43 billion pounds of perfectly good food was thrown out of grocery stores,” according to Move For Hunger.  

Whether the food is damaged, out of date, unattractive, or left untouched due to lack of interest, that’s equivalent to $165 billion wasted each year. That’s an astounding number when you think about it.

Our environmental impact is a topic near and dear to our family’s hearts. We do our best to keep our carbon footprint at the forefront of our minds when making life decisions. That’s why we’ve decided to start a family garden.

It’s an easy way to demonstrate to our kids the amount of hard work involved in the growing of our favorite fruits and vegetables. Sure, we could hop into the car and drive down the street to the local supermarket. But that wouldn’t be an accurate representation of how the process works. Not to mention, tasting the long awaited fruits of your labor is immensely gratifying and humbling.

“Mom, where does our food come from?” our curious daughter will ask. I think to myself, I’ll tell you, and I will show you.

In the spring, we let our kids help pick the seeds, turn and add compost to the tired winter soil, dig, drop the seed, cover, and mark each planting bed. With careful attention, water, and lots of patience, our kids make a stronger connection to the earth and their food by reaping what they sow.

The pleasure we get from watching our children pick tomatoes or raspberries off the vine while shoveling them into their mouths and scouring the beds for more delicious treats is insurmountable. Humorously, I’ve learned my lesson and started planting double of everything after watching the goods get consumed before they even reach the kitchen.

With the rising statistics of unhealthy Americans in our country continue growing, nothing seems more important than instilling a healthy attitude about food within our children and helping them discover the growing process.

As the growing season comes to an end and fall is upon us, we take time to prepare the beds for the next season, tally the seeds that we need to purchase for spring, and say a word of thanks for another successful planting season.

Embrace What You Love

“I began to realize how important it was to be an enthusiast in life. If you are interested in something, no matter what it is, go at it full speed. Embrace it with both arms, hug it, love it, and above all become passionate about it. Lukewarm is no good.”

-Roald Dahl

I came across this quote and wanted to share it with you. However, it’s interpreted, maybe it will make you step back and reflect a little. It did for me. It’s funny how I come across little reminders like this. 

I welcome these breaks. Don’t you?