Book Review and Author Interview with Lindsay Leslie!

I’m super excited to share with you a new picture book that is ready for little hands and creative minds everywhere on February 19th. Along with a sneak peek of the story, author Lindsay Leslie was so nice to answer my questions about her engaging new book. So sit back, grab a cup of tea, and join me. I’m glad you’re here.

Title: THIS BOOK IS SPINELESS

Genre: Picture Book

Ages: 4-8

Author: Lindsay Leslie

Illustrator: Alice Brereton

Publisher: Page Street Kids

Synopsis: Using the five-senses this wary and ‘spineless’ book tries to figure out what kind of story it might have on its pages.

Does it hear spooky wails from a ghost story?
Can it see a mysterious something peeking around a corner?
Is that the dizzy feeling of zero gravity it senses?
Might that be the stinky smell of animals in nature it detects?
Could it be tasting the saltiness of a story on the high seas?

Playful and humorous, Linsday Leslie invites the reader on an adventurous journey as the book grows braver and braver with each page until finally, it grows a spine!

The illustrations are quirky, textured, shape-oriented and colorful. They have an optical illusion effect begging the reader to take a closer look.

Now, it’s time to meet the awesome author, Lindsay Leslie.

Welcome, Lindsay! First and foremost, what was your inspiration behind this engaging title?

My inspiration was two-fold. One, I really had no control over. I remember walking into my youngest son’s room and stepping on one of his picture books because naturally, they were littering the floor. My subconscious took over. I thought things like: Did I break the book? Did I mess up its spine? What if this book were spineless? And, then, I said out loud, “This Book Is Spineless!” I immediately put the title in my notes section on my phone. I knew I had something with that title.

The second inspiration for this book is my personal experience with anxiety. I was an anxious kid and tried to hide it always. I was the kid who didn’t want to go on the roller coaster even though my mom bribed me with a puppy. I was the kid who didn’t want to learn how to swim. I was the kid who feared and feared a fair amount of things. The anxiety shifted over time and became different and not very fun as an adult, but I have developed better coping mechanisms. I was interested in looking at fears, fear of what’s inside all of us, and putting that on the page in a quirky, fun, relatable way. I also wanted the narrative to mimic the anticipation and heightening of anxious emotions and then the calming down.

You also use many sensory elements (hear, see, feel, taste, etc.). How did you come up with this unique twist to the story?

Oh, wow. How did I come up with that? Great question! I haven’t really thought about how that came to be until now. The sensory elements were not in my first awful draft, so it didn’t flow out of me in a flurry of words. They showed up in the second draft. I think with the first draft I was getting to know my character, which is the physical book, and with the second draft, I was exploring more of what the book was experiencing. I think I was trying my best to bring the book to life and to dig into its experiences. Because the book is afraid of the story on its pages, pulling on the senses became more apparent to me as I wrapped in various genres of stories that might be there.

There is a lot of fun play on words using alliteration in your story. Is the Thesaurus your go to?

The Thesaurus is my friend. Oh, yes it is. While some of these words popped into my head, I did spend a lot of time looking and searching for just the right words, like how to describe a particularly odoriferous animal or an alleyway that looks less than inviting. I love nothing more to go on a word hunt because I find some real treasures.


The illustrations are out of this world. There is very much an optical illusion element to it. Is this how you imagined them to be when writing your story?

No, not at all, which is FANTASTIC! I hold these illustrations close to my heart. Alice Brereton is a magician with her powerful, quirky, and thought-provoking art. If you can’t tell, I’m elated that what Alice created looks NOTHING like what was in my head.

How long did you work on this particular story?

I began writing this story in August of 2016. Page Street Kids offered me a contract late June of 2017. Together, my editor and I worked on it well into 2018. Word changes here and there.

If you had one piece of advice for writers, what would it be?

I’ve got so much advice that I could really annoy everyone with it. How about one piece of advice that would resonate no matter where someone is in their writing journey? That piece of advice is to enjoy. Find the work you enjoy, the topic you enjoy, whatever inspires you to start typing or scribbling on paper. Don’t chase the trends. Don’t watch what everyone else is doing. That all changes and you aren’t everyone else. When you write with joy, the reader will read with joy.

What is coming up next for you?

I’ve got some cool stuff going on that I’m excited about. I’ll be at TLA this year, so if you are attending or anywhere Austin, swing on by and do let me know! My second picture book, NOVA THE STAR EATER (illustrated by John Taesoo Kim, Page Street Kids), comes out May 21. I have a third book called DUSK RAIDERS WANTED slated for Spring 2020 with Page Street Kids, illustrated by Ellen Rooney. And, I’m on submission with other work, so fingers crossed!

Thank you for taking the time to answer my questions and for sharing your amazing story with us!

Thank you for having me!

And there you have it.

To check out and purchase THIS BOOK IS SPINELESS visit here.

Want to read more of Lindsay’s picture books? Check out NOVA: THE STAR EATER here.

If you’d like to learn more about Lindsay and see what she’s up to visit her website: https://lindsayleslie.com/

Or visit her social media feeds:

Twitter: @LLeslie

Instagram: @lindsaylesliewrites

Thanks for stopping by and happy reading!


New Year, New Ideas

The new year is upon us, and there’s another writing challenge about to begin.

If you’ve ever visited my site before, you know how much I love writing contests and seeking out ways to help me generate new ideas. If you’ve never been here, well, I love writing contests and seeking out ways to help me generate new ideas. 🙂

Why? They push me to create. While some of the ideas remain locked inside my GoogleDocs without seeing the light of day, others take on a different form and are like a jumping off point a.k.a. somewhere to get started.

It’s about creating. Getting words on paper that can, and often do, spark a new idea. The best writing feeling in the world? When that idea pops in your mind and BAM! You write, and write, and can’t stop until every last word is down. Obviously, the story is nowhere close to being finished. But, it’s not about that. It’s the feeling of motivation and inspiration all in one. That, you’ve-just-got-to-get-it-down-on-paper feeling.

Where am I going with this?

Each January another awesome and free (yes, free!) writing challenge begins. It’s called Storystorm. Chances are you’ve heard of it. If not, you’re in for a treat! Hosted by Tara Lazar, a fabulous children’s book author, Storystorm is for all writers. “Any genre, style, student, amateur, hobbyist, aspiring author, or professional,” can join Tara says.

Intrigued? Here’s how to start:

Begin by signing up on her website. Then, every day in January you will receive a daily post with a writing challenge. The objective is to garner 30 new writing ideas by the end of the month. Some might see the light of day, others may remain locked in your GoogleDocs. 🙂 Again, it’s about creating.

But wait! There are prizes! If you create 30 ideas by the end of the month, you sign a pledge on her website, and you’re eligible to win some awesome prizes like professional consults, book signings, original art, and more.

So, if you’re looking for some extra motivation in the new year and want to have more ideas in your back pocket, come join us. If you’re looking to take part in something fun just because, come join us.

If you have another idea that keeps you writing and creating, please share in the comments below. Like I said, I’m always open to new ideas. 🙂

Cheers to the new year and happy writing!

Holiday Contest

It’s that time of year for jolly, holly fun! After a recent revision on one of my manuscripts, I needed to take a break, try something new, and recharge. So why not enter a holiday writing contest? Perfect! This one is put on by the fabulous picture book writer Susanna Leonard Hill

The guidelines?

  1. It must be kid-friendly
  2. 250-words or less
  3. About a holiday hero or act of heroism

Thanks, Susanna for putting on another fun writing contest

Inspired by my family’s recent trip to the Christmas tree farm, here is my submission. Happy reading and happy holidays to you!

LITTLE SPRUCE 

236-WORDS

Out in the country and high on the hill sprawled a Christmas tree farm. Hidden among the tall, perfectly shaped Evergreens, grew the short, and crooked trees that no one wanted.

“It’s not fair.” Little Spruce shook. “I’ll never find a good home. I’m too small.”

“But you have strong branches,” said a Fir tree.

“Perfect for hanging ornaments.” swayed another.

No one would ever want a tree like me. Little Spruce thought.

Just then, he heard a voice. “Over here, Grandpa!”

A young girl in a knitted hat popped out from behind Little Spruce. Not far behind an exhausted old man followed. “I think we’ve tested every tree,” Grandpa laughed. “How about we take this one?” 

Molly waved the branch up and down. “No. Too wobbly.”

She tried another.

Suddenly, Little Spruce felt a tug. 

“It’s perfect!” said Molly. “Grandma will love it!” 

Little Spruce shook with excitement. Was he finally getting a home? He wondered.

After arriving at the hospital, Molly carefully hung each ornament on Little Spruce’s branches.  

“I knew you were strong enough,” Molly whispered to Little Spruce.

Little Spruce didn’t care about being small anymore. Instead, he was mighty.

“Are you ready?” the nurse peeked in.

Molly nodded.

The nurse slowly pushed Grandma in her wheelchair.

Grandma’s eyes lit up. She waved for the nurse to push her closer. “So strong.” Grandma marveled at Little Spruce. “And beautiful.”

“Just like you,” said Molly.


A Story for the Season

I love this time of year. We get to be with our friends and family to celebrate the season and give thanks. 

Recently I discovered another heartwarming story that provides a wonderful opportunity for discussions about giving, helping others in need, and empathy. 

What a perfect story to share with my children and kindergarten students this time of year!

Picture Book Title: SHELTER

Written by: Celine Claire

Illustrated by: Qin Leng. 

Publisher: Kids Can Press (2017) Age Range: 4-8

 Synopsis: A storm is coming and the forest animals rush to prepare when two strangers emerge from the fog. The animals wonder: Who are these strangers? What are they doing here? What do they want?

When the strangers kindly ask to exchange tea for a chance to sit by a warm fire, or have some cookies for dipping, even just a spot to take comfort in the light of one’s hearth, the strangers are turned away. Except for one generous critter named Little Fox. Because of his kindness, the others discover the meaning of compassion and generosity.

So there you have it! If you’re on the lookout for a picture book to read this time of year, check out Celine Claire’s heartwarming story.

Also, if you have a picture book about kindness, generosity, empathy, etc. that you enjoy reading with your family (or just love reading!), please feel free to leave it in the comments below.

Happy reading and Happy Thanksgiving!

Halloween Contest

 

Author Susanna Leonard Hill is hosting her 8th annual Halloween writing contest. Here’s the catch from Susanna’s blog:

TH8TH ANNUAL HALLOWEENSIE CONTEST
~ FOR CHILDREN’S WRITERS ~
AAHHHRRROOOOOOOOO!!!!!

The Contest: write a 100 word Halloween story appropriate for children (children here defined as 12 and under) (title not included in the 100 words), using the words shivercauldron, and howl.  Your story can be scary, funny, or anything in between, poetry or prose, but it will only count for the contest if it includes those 3 words and is 100 words (you can go under, but not over).

I love being challenged to write something in so little words. It gets those creative juices flowing! Check out her sight to read other fabulous and frightening entries. Thanks, Susanna for the festive activity!

Here are my entries:

Halloween Surprise (99-words)

“Last stop,” Dad says pausing by an old house.

I squeeze his hand.

“This isn’t Grandma and Grandpa’s?”

“Come on.” He winks.

The wind howls around me.

I shiver. Even my fairy wings tremble.

Dad knocks.

Creeaakk…

Inside, a cauldron bubbles.

An old lady wearing a pointed hat stirs the pot.

“Come in,” she cackles.

I hide behind Dad.

“Her stew’s full of eyeballs and spiders!” I whisper.

I yank Dad to escape.

“Happy Halloween!”

“Grandma!” I giggle at her witch costume.

“Welcome to our BOO-tiful new house!” Grandpa howls, carrying candy.

“Now, that’s a trick, but such a treat!”

 

Halloween Mishap (90-words)

Time has come

What to be?

On this frightful Halloween.

 

Find a spell

add some goo

In the cauldron, stir the brew.

 

Gulp! I sip

down it goes

Pop! Out sticks a pointy nose?

 

What is this?

The wrong spell?

I’m not feeling very well.

 

Long black hair

to my knees,

In flies Broomstick on a breeze.

 

Help! I cry,

and I howl

now I’m feeling very foul.

 

Pop! A wart

more green skin,

shiver like a skeleton.

 

It’s too late

I guess I’ll be,

just a witch for Halloween.

 

 

Finding Time

Have you ever wished that time would slow down? Even just a little?

I know I do.

I think back to my pregnancy and being in awe of the amazing process a woman’s body goes through. I remember staring at my stomach watching this little alien creature take over, kicking me at all hours of the night.

Now, they’re 5 and nearly 7, still young, but not babies anymore.

I’m reminded of this everytime Google Photos sends me an email that says, “Rediscover this day. Look back at…”

More like, “Life is moving fast, don’t blink or you’ll miss it.”

Last week, the tears welled in my eyes as I stared at my son’s first birthday party. I remember his ruffled blond hair and the way he used to snuggle up close under my chin when I held him. Thankfully, he’s still a snuggler, but how could that time have passed so fast?

Now when the little reminder pops up in the corner of my email, bugging me to click on it and “rediscover” these moments, I can’t even open them.

Is it because it makes me sad?

Am I worried that I’ll realize these moments won’t last forever?

Or because I just don’t want to revisit the very “homemade” looking cakes I baked for each birthday (I’m no Betty Crocker. It’s okay, I’ve accepted it.).

Or maybe it’s another gentle reminder to live each moment to the fullest. To enjoy the small things in life.

The hugs.

The stories.

The muddy mess kids make when discovering a giant puddle in the backyard (I thank the lucky stars for hoses and cheap bar soap).

I also wonder if these images and thoughts are trying to tell me to be present…

That I need to remember yesterday’s memories, but recognize today’s.

And continue living life to the fullest.

Moreover, we can’t control time, but we can make time.

Especially for those that matter most.

 

 

 

 

Inspired by Nature: PB Review

My family loves spending time in the outdoors. After busy days at work, school, and moving through the daily hustle and bustle of life, there’s an urge to escape and get back to nature. A call to the wild, you could say.

Trekking through the forest, discovering a new trail, or watching the kids run wild and free, there is no doubt that nature is healing.

Over the past couple of years, we’ve set a family goal to visit as many national parks as we can. Our kids take part in the junior ranger programs and have the privilege of meeting the park rangers that work tirelessly to protect our landscapes and wildlife.

The kids have learned about animals, plants, trees, and how to preserve our natural treasures. So far they’ve each earned five badges, one for each park we’ve visited.

The reason I share this is that recently, I came across this picture book titled: OLIVER THE SECOND-LARGEST LIVING THING ON EARTH by Josh Crute and illustrated by John Taesoo Kim.  Not only is it beautifully illustrated, but it’s a story inspired by nature.

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Age Range: 4-8

Publisher: Page Street Kids

Synopsis: A tree named Oliver is tired of being the second-largest tree.  He stretches his limbs in winter, lifts logs in spring, soaks up the sun in summer, and munches on mulch in autumn, trying to grow big enough to be noticed. Until he discovers that he’s been a part of something much larger, the Sequoia National Forest.

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It’s a humorous story with a lot of heart, and there’s an excellent note at the end about the Sequoia National Forest and other second largest things in the world.

It’s a great reminder for children that you don’t always have to come in first. In fact, being second is important, too.

Words

Words are powerful.

Whether displayed on a billboard, expressed through feelings, or read in a book, they are everywhere. Depending on how they are presented, they can be perceived in various ways.

Naturally, I think of picture books and the effect they have on children, even adults.

Recently, my daughter and I were browsing the local bookstore when she bounded over giddy about a book she discovered.

I glanced at the cover. A young girl was staring at a man wrapped in a blanket crouched down on the sidewalk. At first, I was surprised she picked this. Generally, she’s attracted to bright colors and big illustrations. This story was more muted.

“Will you read this to me, Mommy?” she asked.

We found a bench and admired the modestly sized book.

“OLD MAN by Sarah V. and Claude Dubois.” I  began.

the old man book

The story starts by comparing the life of a young girl and a homeless man. With its sparse text and beautiful illustrations, my daughter and I were captivated.

“Mom? Why is he living on the street?”

“Where is the old man’s family?”

“Why can’t he remember his name?”

Questions poured out of my daughter’s mouth.

Sarah V’s. carefully chosen words kept us reading not two, but three times. We talked about homelessness, empathy, acts of kindness, and showing compassion for others.

When it was time to leave, the book’s message stayed with us. As a family, we talked about it during dinner and brainstormed ways we can help others.

This was another gentle reminder, that words, whether spoken or read in a children’s book, are powerful and have a lasting ripple effect on our lives.

If you haven’t read THE OLD MAN by Sarah V. and Claude K. Dubois, check it out. I highly recommend it!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Releases: Children’s Books!

I love, love, love (did I mention, love?) children’s literature. Even as an adult, walking into a bookstore or library, I get a rush of excitement and scoop up more books that I can carry to the check-out. There’s so much laughter, love, humor, and creativity that goes into these little works of art.

Coming out next spring by a brand new publisher, A Belletristic Wander, are two new titles that I can’t wait to get my hands on. Before giving you a brief synopsis of these fabulous tales, check out the amazing illustrations.

rumtum sailer
RUMTUM THE SAILOR by Kyle Duffy, illustrated by Mary Manning

and…

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CHARLIE AND THE HOT BALLOON sketch by Nerris Nassiri, illustrated by Jessica White

Aren’t they awesome?

My son is a huge fan of rhyme, adventures, and humor, so naturally RUMTUM THE SAILOR will be a big hit in our house.

Publisher’s Synopsis:

RUMTUM THE SAILOR is a larger than life adventure of a father who sets sail, but ends up on a deserted island.  Even though he has almost nothing on the island with him (just one oar that happens to wash up), he is determined to keep his promise to his family and be home in time for supper. It is also the story of “Stow-a-way” a mischievous octopus that shares all of Rumtum’s adventures, without Rumtum ever even knowing he is there!

The publisher also adds:

“Beneath the humor and rollicking rhyme of this book, the core feelings of love for his family and the taste of fantasy as he accomplishes the impossible, will touch the heart of the reader.”

I’m hooked!

While that story is all about adventure, this next one takes on a softer tone about a little boy who was told that his mother had “gone to live in the stars.” So what does he do? He discovers the magic of a hot air balloon and decides to build one himself in hopes of finding his mother.

Author’s Synopsis:

“…it’s about a boy searching for his mother. Deeper down, it’s about a child who perseveres through the saddest thing that can happen to them. The story explores themes of love and loss through the eyes of a child and plays with innocent perspectives and determination to move past things.

Magical, right?

Now, for a few more amazing sneak peeks of the illustrators’ brilliant samples and how you can preorder these great new reads!

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CHARLIE AND THE HOT AIR BALLOON beginning sketch by illustrator Jessica White

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CHARLIE AND THE HOT AIR BALLOON beginning sketch by illustrator Jessica White

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Sample sketches by Mary Manning, illustrator of RUMTUM THE SAILOR 

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Sample sketches by Mary Manning, illustrator of RUMTUM THE SAILOR 

Preorder here and learn more about the two authors and illustrators, in addition to the publisher’s personal stories.

Happy reading!

How National Parks Helped Teach our Kids about the Environment

“Mom, what are those big white things?” my daughter asks while peering out the window as we drive through the grassy plains of the Midwest.

“Those are wind turbines. The wind helps make energy which gets turned into power. Like the power that turns on the lamp in your room or the lights in the house.”

Immediately following my explanation came the rounds of questions that spilled out of a curious five-year-old’s mouth after being told that a giant monster-like structure uses wind to create power. It is pretty amazing when you think about it.

Our conversation ignited a critical discussion that my husband and I felt we needed to start sharing with our kids about caring for our environment. How can we instill in them an appreciation and respect for the natural living life around them? After wrestling with this big idea, we finally realized the answer is a lot simpler than we thought: It’s about giving our kids opportunities to interact with nature starting at a young age.

What better way to explore this idea than by visiting and discovering the national parks across the United States and exploring the incredible landscapes of our country? With a map of the U.S. displayed in our family room and pins to mark our destinations, we were ready to explore the history, nature, and learn all about the preservation of our land and animals as a family.

With over fifty national parks spread across the U.S. and nearly 300 million visitors each year, these natural wonders can be a cornerstone in the way we address environmental topics with our offspring. The big question is, where do we begin?

Badlands

My family and I found ourselves beginning our journey by trekking through the rough and jagged trails of the Badlands in South Dakota, witnessing the damaging yet, renewing effects of a natural forest fire that had happened near Jewel Cave National Monument. The charred, black trees were the only remains of what once existed in a dense forest. Through the chaos of fallen branches and rotting trunks, sprung new life. Peering through the now open land, flowers and grass were slowly taking the place of what was once alive. This moment sparked an organic conversation about the dangers and causes of forest fires, but also how they can stimulate new growth.

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My husband and I realized the value of teaching our kids about the magnitude of our actions on the ecosystems around us. While hiking on the paths in Yellowstone National Park, our children would discover a leaf or interesting rock along the way. To a young intrigued mind, this made the perfect souvenir to bring home and show friends. However, this proved to be another teachable moment as we explained the importance of leaving nature where you found it.

Kiersten Einsweiler, blogger and fellow adventure seeker from Hiking In My Flipflops, shares how she and her husband have helped their children to develop a deeper understanding of nature’s inhabitants: “We had a recent run-in with a snake on a trail, and my daughter was absolutely terrified – screaming and crying for a good part of the hike back. On the drive home, she thought maybe the snake was actually a ‘kid just like her’ and was just as scared as she was.”

With her children making this connection, Kiersten goes on to say that she believes her children see the “parallels” between how we respect human beings and living creatures and how nature is the “…home and space of a plant or animal.”

Our kids’ favorite experience on our life-long grand adventure was taking part in the National Park’s Junior Ranger program. Over the years, this program has evolved and now includes national monuments, with many being managed by the park service.

Their motto, “Explore, Learn, and Protect,” quoted by the many children sworn in each year, couldn’t be more true. With the typical participant age being between 5 and 13, our daughter could take part. Our son, who is three, was able to participate in the Pee Wee Ranger program offered at Jewel Cave National Monument located in South Dakota’s Black Hills. We have found that regardless of age, all children are encouraged to take part in their programs.

Making our way to Glacier National Park in Montana, our kids were equipped with various tasks in their Ranger booklets and prepared to earn their badges. Marveling at the giant “monsters of ice” as our son called it, we talked about the correlation between human activity and rising temperatures leading to shrinking glaciers.

Next up? Yellowstone, the world’s first national park located in Wyoming. It is known for its geysers, mountain beauty, and hundreds of animal species. With nearly 4 million people visiting the park, there’s bound to be garbage left behind. After picking up bits of trash found tumbling along the backcountry trails, my husband and I showed our kids what the saying, “Whatever comes in, must come out” quote truly means.

Along with Yellowstone, the national park service has made a concerted effort to become more sustainable based on the changing climate, and the impact visitors have made in the parks. Putting this into perspective, Isle Royale, a remote island in Michigan only accessible by plane or boat, spends $15,000 a year removing guests’ trash. This issue is one my husband and I feel we need to bring to the forefront of our children’s minds. Being respectful of the land, which means cleaning up after ourselves so other’s can enjoy it’s beauty too.

Providing tangible dialogue relevant to our future existence, there is a wealth of information to be shared with our little ones. For example, restoration of the Redwood forest, the impact tourists have on soil erosion in Zion National Park, or how trails protect naturally growing plants. And let’s not forget the increased water and air pollution in the Great Smoky Mountains. How about the encounter of non-native species causing detrimental damage in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Park? These are the real-life experiences exposing the significance as to why we must protect these precious resources.

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Or the other right hand…

Looking back, we’ll never forget the moment they raised their right hand and promised to preserve and protect these places so future generations can enjoy them. From exploring the third largest underground cave to hiking, observing, and identifying animal hides, our children were sworn in and declared lifelong Junior Rangers. The quest to accomplish this noble deed and earning a badge to commemorate this momentous time will forever live in our hearts.

In the words of songwriter Woody Guthrie, “From the Redwood Forest to the gulf stream waters. This land was made for you and me.” As we move into the 21st century, our world continues to change along with its environmental issues. Taking the time to search out destinations that satisfy our lust for adventure and thirst for knowledge, let’s continue to bring awareness to our children who will pass it on to future generations.